Property finance solutions for all

Buy to let mortgages. Commercial mortgages. Property development finance. Short term & bridging loans. Residential mortgages. Whatever your funding needs let our expert, award-winning brokers find the right property finance for you.

Helping property developers get the right finance

We have funding solutions for new build projects, redevelopments, major renovation works or just general refurbishments. We can help with residential, commercial and mixed use developments.

Property development finance explained

Key features

  • Rates from 6%
  • Loans from £50k - £25m+
  • Up to 70% of costs
  • Interest rolled up or paid monthly

Some of our lenders

  • Aldermore Bank PLC
  • Dragonfly
  • United Trust Bank
  • Natwest
  • Barclays Bank
ANY PROPERTY USED AS SECURITY, WHICH MAY INCLUDE YOUR HOME, MAY BE REPOSSESSED IF YOU DO NOT KEEP UP REPAYMENTS ON YOUR MORTGAGE

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Property development finance: News and insight

See all news
  • Government announces ban on new build leaseholds

    The “unjust” practice of selling new build houses as leasehold could be banned under new Government proposals, which will also look to tackle the issue of ground rents, which can often be disproportionately high.

  • Political uncertainty stifles housing market

    House price inflation dropped further in June, as political uncertainty stifles the housing market with agreed sales, new buyer enquiries and new instructions on the decline, according to a new market survey.

  • Portfolio landlords' checklist

    From October 2017, lenders are required to apply a specialist underwriting approach to buy to let mortgage applications from portfolio landlords. In practice this means that you will have to provide lenders with much more detailed information when applying for a mortgage, even if you want a simple remortgage.

  • Bank of England still divided over interest rate rise

    The latest interviews with members of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) indicate that there is still no consensus on whether to raise interest rates, despite the looming vote on the issue which will take place next week.